Notes on Kubernetes

TLDR:

Final solution:

  • docker
  • kubeadm
  • kubectl
  • kubelet
  • helm
  • weave
  • heapster
  • traefik

Sources

Some of the sources I have used to get my Kubernetes cluster up and running:

Walkthrough

Before we begin, update the system:

[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get update

Install Docker

[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install -qy docker.io
[email protected]:~$ docker --version
Docker version 17.03.2-ce, build f5ec1e2

Install Kubernetes apt repository

[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install -y apt-transport-https && curl -s https://packages.cloud.google.com/apt/doc/apt-key.gpg | sudo apt-key add -
[email protected]:~$ echo "deb http://apt.kubernetes.io/ kubernetes-xenial main" \
  | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list.d/kubernetes.list \
  && sudo apt-get update 

Install kubeadm, kubectl and kubelet

[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install -y kubelet kubeadm kubectl
[email protected]:~$ kubelet --version
Kubernetes v1.11.1
[email protected]:~$ kubeadm version
kubeadm version: &version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"11", GitVersion:"v1.11.1", GitCommit:"b1b29978270dc22fecc592ac55d903350454310a", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2018-07-17T18:50:16Z", GoVersion:"go1.10.3", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
[email protected]:~$ kubectl version
Client Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"10", GitVersion:"v1.10.0", GitCommit:"fc32d2f3698e36b93322a3465f63a14e9f0eaead", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2018-03-26T16:55:54Z", GoVersion:"go1.9.3", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
The connection to the server localhost:8080 was refused - did you specify the right host or port?

Initialize kubernetes

[email protected]:~$ sudo kubeadm init
[init] using Kubernetes version: v1.11.1
[preflight] running pre-flight checks
I0807 05:46:52.371257    3480 kernel_validator.go:81] Validating kernel version
I0807 05:46:52.371519    3480 kernel_validator.go:96] Validating kernel config
[preflight/images] Pulling images required for setting up a Kubernetes cluster
[preflight/images] This might take a minute or two, depending on the speed of your internet connection
[preflight/images] You can also perform this action in beforehand using 'kubeadm config images pull'
[kubelet] Writing kubelet environment file with flags to file "/var/lib/kubelet/kubeadm-flags.env"
[kubelet] Writing kubelet configuration to file "/var/lib/kubelet/config.yaml"
[preflight] Activating the kubelet service
[certificates] Generated ca certificate and key.
[certificates] Generated apiserver certificate and key.
[certificates] apiserver serving cert is signed for DNS names [dev16.jitsejan.com kubernetes kubernetes.default kubernetes.default.svc kubernetes.default.svc.cluster.local] and IPs [10.96.0.1 142.44.184.35]
[certificates] Generated apiserver-kubelet-client certificate and key.
[certificates] Generated sa key and public key.
[certificates] Generated front-proxy-ca certificate and key.
[certificates] Generated front-proxy-client certificate and key.
[certificates] Generated etcd/ca certificate and key.
[certificates] Generated etcd/server certificate and key.
[certificates] etcd/server serving cert is signed for DNS names [dev16.jitsejan.com localhost] and IPs [127.0.0.1 ::1]
[certificates] Generated etcd/peer certificate and key.
[certificates] etcd/peer serving cert is signed for DNS names [dev16.jitsejan.com localhost] and IPs [142.44.184.35 127.0.0.1 ::1]
[certificates] Generated etcd/healthcheck-client certificate and key.
[certificates] Generated apiserver-etcd-client certificate and key.
[certificates] valid certificates and keys now exist in "/etc/kubernetes/pki"
[kubeconfig] Wrote KubeConfig file to disk: "/etc/kubernetes/admin.conf"
[kubeconfig] Wrote KubeConfig file to disk: "/etc/kubernetes/kubelet.conf"
[kubeconfig] Wrote KubeConfig file to disk: "/etc/kubernetes/controller-manager.conf"
[kubeconfig] Wrote KubeConfig file to disk: "/etc/kubernetes/scheduler.conf"
[controlplane] wrote Static Pod manifest for component kube-apiserver to "/etc/kubernetes/manifests/kube-apiserver.yaml"
[controlplane] wrote Static Pod manifest for component kube-controller-manager to "/etc/kubernetes/manifests/kube-controller-manager.yaml"
[controlplane] wrote Static Pod manifest for component kube-scheduler to "/etc/kubernetes/manifests/kube-scheduler.yaml"
[etcd] Wrote Static Pod manifest for a local etcd instance to "/etc/kubernetes/manifests/etcd.yaml"
[init] waiting for the kubelet to boot up the control plane as Static Pods from directory "/etc/kubernetes/manifests" 
[init] this might take a minute or longer if the control plane images have to be pulled
[apiclient] All control plane components are healthy after 46.003711 seconds
[uploadconfig] storing the configuration used in ConfigMap "kubeadm-config" in the "kube-system" Namespace
[kubelet] Creating a ConfigMap "kubelet-config-1.11" in namespace kube-system with the configuration for the kubelets in the cluster
[markmaster] Marking the node dev16.jitsejan.com as master by adding the label "node-role.kubernetes.io/master=''"
[markmaster] Marking the node dev16.jitsejan.com as master by adding the taints [node-role.kubernetes.io/master:NoSchedule]
[patchnode] Uploading the CRI Socket information "/var/run/dockershim.sock" to the Node API object "dev16.jitsejan.com" as an annotation
[bootstraptoken] using token: j8gf09.pe16y63l0hxygc77
[bootstraptoken] configured RBAC rules to allow Node Bootstrap tokens to post CSRs in order for nodes to get long term certificate credentials
[bootstraptoken] configured RBAC rules to allow the csrapprover controller automatically approve CSRs from a Node Bootstrap Token
[bootstraptoken] configured RBAC rules to allow certificate rotation for all node client certificates in the cluster
[bootstraptoken] creating the "cluster-info" ConfigMap in the "kube-public" namespace
[addons] Applied essential addon: CoreDNS
[addons] Applied essential addon: kube-proxy

Your Kubernetes master has initialized successfully!

To start using your cluster, you need to run the following as a regular user:

  mkdir -p $HOME/.kube
  sudo cp -i /etc/kubernetes/admin.conf $HOME/.kube/config
  sudo chown $(id -u):$(id -g) $HOME/.kube/config

You should now deploy a pod network to the cluster.
Run "kubectl apply -f [podnetwork].yaml" with one of the options listed at:
  https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/cluster-administration/addons/

You can now join any number of machines by running the following on each node
as root:

  kubeadm join 142.44.184.35:6443 --token j8gf09.pe16y63l0hxygc77 --discovery-token-ca-cert-hash sha256:d8d47cbd352035d5a7746d0ed7e54ae7c0c6bcbb5e89ef410039f7b457be853f

Run the steps mentioned in the previous output:

[email protected]:~$ mkdir -p $HOME/.kube
[email protected]:~$ sudo cp -i /etc/kubernetes/admin.conf $HOME/.kube/config
[email protected]:~$ sudo chown $(id -u):$(id -g) $HOME/.kube/config

Weave net

[email protected]:~$ export kubever=$(kubectl version | base64 | tr -d '\n')
[email protected]:~$ kubectl apply -f "https://cloud.weave.works/k8s/net?k8s-version=$kubever"
serviceaccount/weave-net created
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/weave-net created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/weave-net created
role.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/weave-net created
rolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/weave-net created
daemonset.extensions/weave-net created

Untaint the master node

Make sure we can install pods on the master node:

[email protected]:~$ kubectl taint nodes --all node-role.kubernetes.io/master-
node/dev16.jitsejan.com untainted

Check status of the pods:

[email protected]:~$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE     NAME                                         READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
kube-system   coredns-78fcdf6894-2khbk                     1/1       Running   0          4m
kube-system   coredns-78fcdf6894-flmnd                     1/1       Running   0          4m
kube-system   etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                      1/1       Running   0          3m
kube-system   kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          3m
kube-system   kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com   1/1       Running   0          4m
kube-system   kube-proxy-59l87                             1/1       Running   0          4m
kube-system   kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          4m
kube-system   weave-net-rkmrb                              2/2       Running   0          1m

Install helm

Install the package manager for Kubernetes:

[email protected]:~$ sudo snap install helm
2018-08-07T06:04:43-07:00 INFO Waiting for restart...
helm 2.9.1 from 'snapcrafters' installed
[email protected]:~$ sudo kubectl create -f ./helm-rbac.yml
serviceaccount/tiller created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/tiller created
[email protected]:~$ sudo cp ~/.kube/config /root/snap/helm/common/kube/config
[email protected]:~$ sudo helm init --service-account tiller
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/repository 
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/repository/cache 
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/repository/local 
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/plugins 
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/starters 
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/cache/archive 
Creating /root/snap/helm/common/repository/repositories.yaml 
Adding stable repo with URL: https://kubernetes-charts.storage.googleapis.com 
Adding local repo with URL: http://127.0.0.1:8879/charts 
$HELM_HOME has been configured at /root/snap/helm/common.

Tiller (the Helm server-side component) has been installed into your Kubernetes Cluster.

Please note: by default, Tiller is deployed with an insecure 'allow unauthenticated users' policy.
For more information on securing your installation see: https://docs.helm.sh/using_helm/#securing-your-helm-installation
Happy Helming!
[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ sudo helm version --short
Client: v2.9.1+g20adb27
Server: v2.9.1+g20adb27

Check status of the pods:

[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE        NAME                                         READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
kube-system      coredns-78fcdf6894-2khbk                     1/1       Running   0          45m
kube-system      coredns-78fcdf6894-flmnd                     1/1       Running   0          45m
kube-system      etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                      1/1       Running   0          44m
kube-system      kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          44m
kube-system      kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com   1/1       Running   0          44m
kube-system      kube-proxy-59l87                             1/1       Running   0          45m
kube-system      kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          44m
kube-system      tiller-deploy-759cb9df9-ddv2h                1/1       Running   0          1m
kube-system      weave-net-rkmrb                              2/2       Running   0          41m

Heapster

[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ sudo helm install stable/heapster --name heapster --set rbac.create=true
NAME:   heapster
LAST DEPLOYED: Tue Aug  7 10:04:28 2018
NAMESPACE: default
STATUS: DEPLOYED

RESOURCES:
==> v1/Service
NAME      TYPE       CLUSTER-IP    EXTERNAL-IP  PORT(S)   AGE
heapster  ClusterIP  10.108.195.4  <none>       8082/TCP  1s

==> v1beta1/Deployment
NAME               DESIRED  CURRENT  UP-TO-DATE  AVAILABLE  AGE
heapster-heapster  1        1        1           0          1s

==> v1/Pod(related)
NAME                                READY  STATUS             RESTARTS  AGE
heapster-heapster-7bb6d67b9d-h77tj  0/2    ContainerCreating  0         0s

==> v1/ServiceAccount
NAME               SECRETS  AGE
heapster-heapster  1        1s

==> v1beta1/ClusterRoleBinding
NAME               AGE
heapster-heapster  1s

==> v1beta1/Role
NAME                         AGE
heapster-heapster-pod-nanny  1s

==> v1beta1/RoleBinding
NAME                         AGE
heapster-heapster-pod-nanny  1s


NOTES:
1. Get the application URL by running these commands:
  export POD_NAME=$(kubectl get pods --namespace default -l "app=heapster-heapster" -o jsonpath="{.items[0].metadata.name}")
  kubectl --namespace default port-forward $POD_NAME 8082

Traefik

Træfik is a modern HTTP reverse proxy and load balancer that makes deploying microservices easy. Træfik integrates with your existing infrastructure components (Docker, Swarm mode, Kubernetes, Marathon, Consul, Etcd, Rancher, Amazon ECS, ...) and configures itself automatically and dynamically. Pointing Træfik at your orchestrator should be the only configuration step you need.

Docs

---
kind: ClusterRole
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1beta1
metadata:
  name: traefik-ingress-controller
rules:
  - apiGroups:
      - ""
    resources:
      - services
      - endpoints
      - secrets
    verbs:
      - get
      - list
      - watch
  - apiGroups:
      - extensions
    resources:
      - ingresses
    verbs:
      - get
      - list
      - watch
---
kind: ClusterRoleBinding
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1beta1
metadata:
  name: traefik-ingress-controller
roleRef:
  apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
  kind: ClusterRole
  name: traefik-ingress-controller
subjects:
- kind: ServiceAccount
  name: traefik-ingress-controller
  namespace: kube-system
[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ kubectl apply -f traefik-rbac.yml 
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/traefik-ingress-controller created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/traefik-ingress-controller created
[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ kubectl apply -f traefik-deployment.yml 
serviceaccount/traefik-ingress-controller created
deployment.extensions/traefik-ingress-controller created
service/traefik-ingress-service created
[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ kubectl --namespace=kube-system get pods
NAME                                          READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
coredns-78fcdf6894-2khbk                      1/1       Running   0          1h
coredns-78fcdf6894-flmnd                      1/1       Running   0          1h
etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                       1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com             1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com    1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-proxy-59l87                              1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com             1/1       Running   0          1h
tiller-deploy-759cb9df9-ddv2h                 1/1       Running   0          17m
traefik-ingress-controller-6f6d87769d-5nrvq   1/1       Running   0          20s
weave-net-rkmrb                               2/2       Running   0          58m
[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ kubectl get services --namespace=kube-system
NAME                      TYPE        CLUSTER-IP       EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)                       AGE
kube-dns                  ClusterIP   10.96.0.10       <none>        53/UDP,53/TCP                 1h
tiller-deploy             ClusterIP   10.106.232.150   <none>        44134/TCP                     18m
traefik-ingress-service   NodePort    10.106.201.31    <none>        80:30321/TCP,8080:32262/TCP   1m
[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ curl -X GET 10.106.201.31
404 page not found

Check the pods:

[email protected]:~/kubernetes-dev$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE        NAME                                          READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
kube-system      coredns-78fcdf6894-2khbk                      1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      coredns-78fcdf6894-flmnd                      1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                       1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com             1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com    1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      kube-proxy-59l87                              1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com             1/1       Running   0          1h
kube-system      tiller-deploy-759cb9df9-tgnkq                 1/1       Running   0          5m
kube-system      traefik-ingress-controller-66f46799fd-54pkj   1/1       Running   0          2m
kube-system      traefik-ingress-controller-66f46799fd-f42wk   1/1       Running   0          2m
kube-system      traefik-ingress-controller-external-0         1/1       Running   0          30s
kube-system      traefik-ingress-controller-external-1         1/1       Running   0          28s
kube-system      weave-net-rkmrb                               2/2       Running   0          1h
metallb-system   controller-67cb74b4b5-4ll62                   1/1       Running   0          1h
metallb-system   speaker-bbqnd                                 1/1       Running   0          1h

Alternatives


Minikube

Minikube is a tool that makes it easy to run Kubernetes locally. Minikube runs a single-node Kubernetes cluster inside a VM on your laptop for users looking to try out Kubernetes or develop with it day-to-day.

Use Minikube to install a single node Kubernetes cluster. I didn't go for this solution, because it requires too much additional configuration to get it properly running on a VPS. I have tried with different virtualization techniques, but KVM, KVM2 and VirtualBox all had their issues. I ended up using vm-driver=none, which means you run Kubernetes directly on Linux, but requires you to be root.. Locally this is the preferred way of testing Kubernetes if you are not using Docker for Desktop, which has native support for Kubernetes. Minikube is under heavy development and the community strives to make this the default way of testing Kubernetes for developers.

Install

[email protected]:~$ curl -Lo minikube https://storage.googleapis.com/minikube/releases/latest/minikube-linux-amd64 && chmod +x minikube && sudo cp minikube /usr/local/bin/ && rm minikube
[email protected]:~$ minikube version
minikube version: v0.28.2

Start the Kubernetes cluster

[email protected]:~$ sudo minikube start --vm-driver=none
Starting local Kubernetes v1.10.0 cluster...
Starting VM...
Getting VM IP address...
Moving files into cluster...
Downloading kubeadm v1.10.0
Downloading kubelet v1.10.0
Finished Downloading kubelet v1.10.0
Finished Downloading kubeadm v1.10.0
Setting up certs...
Connecting to cluster...
Setting up kubeconfig...
Starting cluster components...
Kubectl is now configured to use the cluster.
===================
WARNING: IT IS RECOMMENDED NOT TO RUN THE NONE DRIVER ON PERSONAL WORKSTATIONS
    The 'none' driver will run an insecure kubernetes apiserver as root that may leave the host vulnerable to CSRF attacks

When using the none driver, the kubectl config and credentials generated will be root owned and will appear in the root home directory.
You will need to move the files to the appropriate location and then set the correct permissions.  An example of this is below:

    sudo mv /root/.kube $HOME/.kube # this will write over any previous configuration
    sudo chown -R $USER $HOME/.kube
    sudo chgrp -R $USER $HOME/.kube

    sudo mv /root/.minikube $HOME/.minikube # this will write over any previous configuration
    sudo chown -R $USER $HOME/.minikube
    sudo chgrp -R $USER $HOME/.minikube

This can also be done automatically by setting the env var CHANGE_MINIKUBE_NONE_USER=true
Loading cached images from config file.
[email protected]:~$ sudo kubectl config current-context
minikube

Flannel (instead of Weave)

Another network layer for the containers that can be used is flannel.

flannel is a virtual network that gives a subnet to each host for use with container runtimes.

Platforms like Google's Kubernetes assume that each container (pod) has a unique, routable IP inside the cluster. The advantage of this model is that it reduces the complexity of doing port mapping.

[email protected]:~$ kubeadm init --pod-network-cidr=10.244.0.0/16 --apiserver-advertise-address 142.44.184.35
[email protected]:~$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/coreos/flannel/master/Documentation/kube-flannel.yml
[email protected]:~$ kubectl create -f kube-flannel.yml --namespace=kube-system
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/flannel created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/flannel created
serviceaccount/flannel created
configmap/kube-flannel-cfg created
daemonset.extensions/kube-flannel-ds-amd64 created
daemonset.extensions/kube-flannel-ds-arm64 created
daemonset.extensions/kube-flannel-ds-arm created
daemonset.extensions/kube-flannel-ds-ppc64le created
daemonset.extensions/kube-flannel-ds-s390x created

[email protected]:~$ kubectl get nodes
NAME                 STATUS    ROLES     AGE       VERSION
dev16.jitsejan.com   Ready     master    7m        v1.11.1

[email protected]:~$ kubectl get pods -n kube-system
NAME                                         READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
coredns-78fcdf6894-lfrf9                     1/1       Running   0          8m
coredns-78fcdf6894-tblp9                     1/1       Running   0          8m
etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                      1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com   1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-flannel-ds-amd64-bgdhb                  1/1       Running   0          1m
kube-proxy-mz7jt                             1/1       Running   0          8m
kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          7m

Calico (instead of Weave)

Instead of using Weave or Flannel, we can use Calico to create a virtual network in our Kubernetes cluster.

[email protected]:~$ sudo kubectl apply -f https://docs.projectcalico.org/master/getting-started/kubernetes/installation/hosted/etcd.yaml
daemonset.extensions "calico-etcd" created
service "calico-etcd" created
[email protected]:~$ sudo kubectl apply -f https://docs.projectcalico.org/master/getting-started/kubernetes/installation/rbac.yaml
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io "calico-kube-controllers" created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io "calico-kube-controllers" created
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io "calico-node" created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io "calico-node" created
[email protected]:~$ sudo kubectl apply -f \
https://docs.projectcalico.org/master/getting-started/kubernetes/installation/hosted/calico.yaml
configmap "calico-config" created
secret "calico-etcd-secrets" created
daemonset.extensions "calico-node" created
serviceaccount "calico-node" created
deployment.extensions "calico-kube-controllers" created
serviceaccount "calico-kube-controllers" created
[email protected]:~$ watch kubectl get pods --all-namespaces

Every 2.0s: kubectl get pods --all-namespaces                                                                                                                                                                 Fri Aug  3 04:57:04 2018

NAMESPACE     NAME                                         READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
kube-system   calico-etcd-926qj                            1/1       Running   0          5m
kube-system   calico-kube-controllers-bcb7959cd-5njws      1/1       Running   0          2m
kube-system   calico-node-p45mz                            2/2       Running   0          2m
kube-system   coredns-78fcdf6894-kxsff                     1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-system   coredns-78fcdf6894-r2brs                     1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-system   etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                      1/1       Running   0          6m
kube-system   kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-system   kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com   1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-system   kube-proxy-kb559                             1/1       Running   0          7m
kube-system   kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          7m

metallb (instead of Traefik)

Because we are not using EKS, AKS or GCP, we need to deal with the load balancer ourselves. Before I showed how to use Traefik as the load balancer to take care of all incoming traffic to the VPS, but [metallb[(https://metallb.universe.tf/)] could be a good alternative. My initial approach involved both Traefik and metallb, but this seemed to create overhead and Traefik has enough functionality to handle the ingress and egress by itself.

Install the loadbalancer metallb

[email protected]:~$ kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/google/metallb/v0.7.2/manifests/metallb.yaml
namespace/metallb-system created
serviceaccount/controller created
serviceaccount/speaker created
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/metallb-system:controller created
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/metallb-system:speaker created
role.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/config-watcher created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/metallb-system:controller created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/metallb-system:speaker created
rolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/config-watcher created
daemonset.apps/speaker created
deployment.apps/controller created
[email protected]:~$ kubectl get pods -n metallb-system
NAME                          READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
controller-67cb74b4b5-4ll62   1/1       Running   0          31s
speaker-bbqnd                 1/1       Running   0          31s

Configure the loadbalancer

metallb-conf.yml

apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
  namespace: metallb-system
  name: config
data:
  config: |
    address-pools:
    - name: default
      protocol: layer2
      addresses:
      - 192.168.1.16/28
[email protected]:~$ kubectl apply -f metallb-conf.yml 
configmap/config created
[email protected]:~$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE        NAME                                         READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
kube-system      coredns-78fcdf6894-2khbk                     1/1       Running   0          52m
kube-system      coredns-78fcdf6894-flmnd                     1/1       Running   0          52m
kube-system      etcd-dev16.jitsejan.com                      1/1       Running   0          51m
kube-system      kube-apiserver-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          51m
kube-system      kube-controller-manager-dev16.jitsejan.com   1/1       Running   0          51m
kube-system      kube-proxy-59l87                             1/1       Running   0          52m
kube-system      kube-scheduler-dev16.jitsejan.com            1/1       Running   0          51m
kube-system      tiller-deploy-759cb9df9-ddv2h                1/1       Running   0          8m
kube-system      weave-net-rkmrb                              2/2       Running   0          48m
metallb-system   controller-67cb74b4b5-4ll62                  1/1       Running   0          46m
metallb-system   speaker-bbqnd                                1/1       Running   0          46m